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  • Energy Research

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vanya Zhivkova;

    In the article there is made a critical survey of some possibilities and issues, connected with the use of biofuels as an alternative to the traditional fuels in transport, for which there is used the descriptive - analytical method. There is clarified the n ature of biofuels, the kinds of biofuels, their advantages and disadvantages. Also presented is the state and development of the production of biofuels in Bulgaria. There is traced the evolution and the localization of the production of biofuels on a globa l scale. There is also given a brief survey of the legal framework regulating the production and consumption of biofuels.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Petra Petrovics; Roland Szilágyi;

    Global changes in recent decades have led to a demand to replace natural gas with renewable energy sources. The aim of this study is to prove that natural gas as an energy resource is not affordable in small towns or villages, which have been facing a difficult time because of socio-cultural factors and the lack of economic resources. A village in North Hungary, Csernely was selected, because its geographical and economic conditions are appropriate for implementation of this change. Csernely is a typical Hungarian small village, which is in need of development. We performed a cluster analysis and found that the proportion of ‘household clusters’ reflects the social stratification of villages in Hungary.A long-term goal is to develop an energy supply model based on an alternative resource (such as biomass) that is available on location, is able to substitute for natural gas, and covers fully or partially the heat energy needs of Csernely (Szemmelveisz et al., 2011). The first step is to show that households in Csernely would benefit from the replacement of natural gas. We investigated whether there is any significant difference between the use of gas and solid fuels in the households in Csernely. We found that households are willing to use other alternative energy sources, and that the majority of them have already started to use solid fuels. However, with organized implementation, this can be more efficient and cheaper as well.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Turtur, Claus W.;
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Paul Koutstaal; Michiel Bijlsma; Gijsbert Zwart; X. van Tilburg;

    A renewable obligation combined with tradable renewable energy certificates is a market-based instrument used to promote the production of electricity from renewable energy sources. A renewable obligation is an alternative for subsidies. A renewable obligation will only be an efficient instrument if certificate markets are efficient. This requires that there is no market power and no anti-competitive behaviour on the certificate market. If the current developments in Dutch renewable energy production continue, market power on a future renewable certificate market in the Netherlands will probably not be an issue, even if the RO should only rest on the retail market instead of on the whole electricity market. A renewable obligation will raise the retail price for consumers, thereby reducing consumer surplus. Simulations show that the retail electricity price increases with € 30 per MWh to a level of € 104 per MWh in case of a 30% renewable target. Consumer surplus is reduced with 19% compared to the baseline scenario. In contrast, a subsidy such as the Dutch SDE which is financed from the state budget has the effect to (slightly) lower the retail electricity price, thereby increasing consumer surplus. It should however be realised that the costs of the subsidy will indirectly affect electricity consumers through their tax payments.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Victoria Shestalova; Chiara Criscuolo; Nick Johnstone; Carlo Menon;

    This study assesses the role of feed-in tariffs (FITs) and renewable energy certificates (RECs) in creating incentives for cross-border investments and for investments in particular technological portfolios via M&A. The analysis explores the dataset on M&As in alternative energy sources worldwide over 2005‑2011. The results suggests that FITs encourage more diversified M&A than RECs. With respect to foreign investment, the study finds a linear relationship between FITs and cross-border M&As in the wind energy sector, but an inverted U-shaped relationship in the solar energy sector. One possible explanation for the latter may lie in reduced policy credibility due to the public finance implications of ‘generous’ FITs. Another possible explanation for this finding concerns the use of high solar FITs by countries whose natural conditions provide little comparative advantage in solar energy, suggesting that low profitability and limited potential of solar energy in those countries might have deterred the entry of foreign investors.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Eva Niesten;

    This paper analyses two effects of the current Dutch regulation on the system operators of the electricity network and on teh decentralised generators of electricity, and suggests a number of improvements in the tariff regulation. The increase in the distributed generation of electricity, with wind turbines and solar panels, necessitates investments in the distribution network. The current tariff regulation in the Dutch electricity industry, with its ex post evaluation of the efficiency of investments and the frontier shift in the x-factor, delays these investments. In the unbundled electricity industry, the investments in the network need to be coordinated with those in the distributed generation of electricity to enable the DSOs to build enough network capacity. The current Dutch regulations do not provide for a sufficient information exchange between the generators and the system operators to coordinate the investments. This paper analyses these two effects of the Dutch regulation, and suggests improvements to the regulation of the network connection and transportation tariffs to allow for sufficient network capacity and coordination between the investments in the network and in the generation of electricity. These improvements include locally differentiated tariffs that increase with an increasing concentration of distributed generators.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Charles-Adrien Huraux; Markus Herrmann;

    Le présent travail a été réalisé principalement en 2011 dans la perspective de dresser un portrait de la situation globale de la production d'électricité par le vent dans laquelle le contexte québécois est la préoccupation centrale. Face à l'étendue des facettes potentielles du sujet, des conditions nécessaires et suffisantes pour refléter la position actuelle et la perspective de développement de l'énergie éolienne au Québec ont été sélectionnées pour être développées sous forme de revue comparative et critique de la littérature accessible sur le sujet. Le texte ne prétend pas être une revue exhaustive des écrits qui concernent l'éolien québécois, mais constitue tout de même une tentative de donner un aperçu représentatif du contexte dans lequel a évolué l’industrie.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Thomas Heinzow; Richard S.J. Tol; Burkhard Bruemmer;
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Alexandre SOKIC;

    Cet article se propose de construire un cadre d’analyse microéconomique analytique permettant d’étudier les conditions d’existence et les déterminants de la compétitivité d’une technologie de chaudière fonctionnant au bois-énergie dans un cadre industriel. Pour ce faire, on choisit d’étudier une firme représentative de l’industrie du séchage des bois dont le processus de production consiste en la fourniture d’énergie calorifique destinée au séchage des bois. Pour assurer son processus de production la firme dispose de deux technologies de chaudière alternatives, l’une fonctionnant au combustible fossile et l’autre au bois-énergie. Le principe de la modélisation repose sur la formulation des fonctions de coût associées à chacune des technologies en présence. Le calcul des éléments de la solution analytique du modèle permet d’envisager les différents aspects du choix technologique d’une unité industrielle du séchage des bois, les modes et l’efficacité d’une intervention publique, et les conditions de coûts de production et de prix de vente devant prévaloir dans le système d’approvisionnement en ressource bois-énergie.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Eric Knight; Nicholas Howarth;

    Much academic attention has been paid to the role of carbon pricing in developing a market-led response to low carbon energy innovation. Taking an evolutionary economics perspective this paper makes the case as to why price mechanisms alone are insufficient to support new energy technologies coming to market. In doing so, we set out the unique investment barriers in the clean energy space. For guidance on possible approaches to non-carbon price based policies that seek to tackle these barriers we turn to case studies from Asia, a region which has experienced a strong uptake in climate policy in recent years.

Advanced search in Research products
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Subject
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Energy Research. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,738 Research products, page 1 of 274
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Vanya Zhivkova;

    In the article there is made a critical survey of some possibilities and issues, connected with the use of biofuels as an alternative to the traditional fuels in transport, for which there is used the descriptive - analytical method. There is clarified the n ature of biofuels, the kinds of biofuels, their advantages and disadvantages. Also presented is the state and development of the production of biofuels in Bulgaria. There is traced the evolution and the localization of the production of biofuels on a globa l scale. There is also given a brief survey of the legal framework regulating the production and consumption of biofuels.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Petra Petrovics; Roland Szilágyi;

    Global changes in recent decades have led to a demand to replace natural gas with renewable energy sources. The aim of this study is to prove that natural gas as an energy resource is not affordable in small towns or villages, which have been facing a difficult time because of socio-cultural factors and the lack of economic resources. A village in North Hungary, Csernely was selected, because its geographical and economic conditions are appropriate for implementation of this change. Csernely is a typical Hungarian small village, which is in need of development. We performed a cluster analysis and found that the proportion of ‘household clusters’ reflects the social stratification of villages in Hungary.A long-term goal is to develop an energy supply model based on an alternative resource (such as biomass) that is available on location, is able to substitute for natural gas, and covers fully or partially the heat energy needs of Csernely (Szemmelveisz et al., 2011). The first step is to show that households in Csernely would benefit from the replacement of natural gas. We investigated whether there is any significant difference between the use of gas and solid fuels in the households in Csernely. We found that households are willing to use other alternative energy sources, and that the majority of them have already started to use solid fuels. However, with organized implementation, this can be more efficient and cheaper as well.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Turtur, Claus W.;
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Paul Koutstaal; Michiel Bijlsma; Gijsbert Zwart; X. van Tilburg;

    A renewable obligation combined with tradable renewable energy certificates is a market-based instrument used to promote the production of electricity from renewable energy sources. A renewable obligation is an alternative for subsidies. A renewable obligation will only be an efficient instrument if certificate markets are efficient. This requires that there is no market power and no anti-competitive behaviour on the certificate market. If the current developments in Dutch renewable energy production continue, market power on a future renewable certificate market in the Netherlands will probably not be an issue, even if the RO should only rest on the retail market instead of on the whole electricity market. A renewable obligation will raise the retail price for consumers, thereby reducing consumer surplus. Simulations show that the retail electricity price increases with € 30 per MWh to a level of € 104 per MWh in case of a 30% renewable target. Consumer surplus is reduced with 19% compared to the baseline scenario. In contrast, a subsidy such as the Dutch SDE which is financed from the state budget has the effect to (slightly) lower the retail electricity price, thereby increasing consumer surplus. It should however be realised that the costs of the subsidy will indirectly affect electricity consumers through their tax payments.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Victoria Shestalova; Chiara Criscuolo; Nick Johnstone; Carlo Menon;

    This study assesses the role of feed-in tariffs (FITs) and renewable energy certificates (RECs) in creating incentives for cross-border investments and for investments in particular technological portfolios via M&A. The analysis explores the dataset on M&As in alternative energy sources worldwide over 2005‑2011. The results suggests that FITs encourage more diversified M&A than RECs. With respect to foreign investment, the study finds a linear relationship between FITs and cross-border M&As in the wind energy sector, but an inverted U-shaped relationship in the solar energy sector. One possible explanation for the latter may lie in reduced policy credibility due to the public finance implications of ‘generous’ FITs. Another possible explanation for this finding concerns the use of high solar FITs by countries whose natural conditions provide little comparative advantage in solar energy, suggesting that low profitability and limited potential of solar energy in those countries might have deterred the entry of foreign investors.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Eva Niesten;

    This paper analyses two effects of the current Dutch regulation on the system operators of the electricity network and on teh decentralised generators of electricity, and suggests a number of improvements in the tariff regulation. The increase in the distributed generation of electricity, with wind turbines and solar panels, necessitates investments in the distribution network. The current tariff regulation in the Dutch electricity industry, with its ex post evaluation of the efficiency of investments and the frontier shift in the x-factor, delays these investments. In the unbundled electricity industry, the investments in the network need to be coordinated with those in the distributed generation of electricity to enable the DSOs to build enough network capacity. The current Dutch regulations do not provide for a sufficient information exchange between the generators and the system operators to coordinate the investments. This paper analyses these two effects of the Dutch regulation, and suggests improvements to the regulation of the network connection and transportation tariffs to allow for sufficient network capacity and coordination between the investments in the network and in the generation of electricity. These improvements include locally differentiated tariffs that increase with an increasing concentration of distributed generators.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Charles-Adrien Huraux; Markus Herrmann;

    Le présent travail a été réalisé principalement en 2011 dans la perspective de dresser un portrait de la situation globale de la production d'électricité par le vent dans laquelle le contexte québécois est la préoccupation centrale. Face à l'étendue des facettes potentielles du sujet, des conditions nécessaires et suffisantes pour refléter la position actuelle et la perspective de développement de l'énergie éolienne au Québec ont été sélectionnées pour être développées sous forme de revue comparative et critique de la littérature accessible sur le sujet. Le texte ne prétend pas être une revue exhaustive des écrits qui concernent l'éolien québécois, mais constitue tout de même une tentative de donner un aperçu représentatif du contexte dans lequel a évolué l’industrie.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Thomas Heinzow; Richard S.J. Tol; Burkhard Bruemmer;
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Alexandre SOKIC;

    Cet article se propose de construire un cadre d’analyse microéconomique analytique permettant d’étudier les conditions d’existence et les déterminants de la compétitivité d’une technologie de chaudière fonctionnant au bois-énergie dans un cadre industriel. Pour ce faire, on choisit d’étudier une firme représentative de l’industrie du séchage des bois dont le processus de production consiste en la fourniture d’énergie calorifique destinée au séchage des bois. Pour assurer son processus de production la firme dispose de deux technologies de chaudière alternatives, l’une fonctionnant au combustible fossile et l’autre au bois-énergie. Le principe de la modélisation repose sur la formulation des fonctions de coût associées à chacune des technologies en présence. Le calcul des éléments de la solution analytique du modèle permet d’envisager les différents aspects du choix technologique d’une unité industrielle du séchage des bois, les modes et l’efficacité d’une intervention publique, et les conditions de coûts de production et de prix de vente devant prévaloir dans le système d’approvisionnement en ressource bois-énergie.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Eric Knight; Nicholas Howarth;

    Much academic attention has been paid to the role of carbon pricing in developing a market-led response to low carbon energy innovation. Taking an evolutionary economics perspective this paper makes the case as to why price mechanisms alone are insufficient to support new energy technologies coming to market. In doing so, we set out the unique investment barriers in the clean energy space. For guidance on possible approaches to non-carbon price based policies that seek to tackle these barriers we turn to case studies from Asia, a region which has experienced a strong uptake in climate policy in recent years.